Category Archives: Yungdrung Bon Monasteries

The Next Generation of Knowledge Holders

Young Yungdrung Bon monks in Sikkim preparing to receive HH 34th Menri Trizin Rinpoche. Photo credit: Unknown.

Grand Enthronement of His Holiness 34th Menri Trizen

HH 34th Menri Trizen Dawa Dargye Rinpoche with Dr. Lobsang Sangye. Photo credit: Unknown

The grand enthronement ceremony of His Holiness 34th Menri Trizen Dawa Dargye Rinpoche was attended by the president of the Central Tibetan Administration, Dr. Lobsang Sangay. During the event, Dr. Sangay gave a speech and also presented the 34th Menri Trizen Rinpoche with a mandala offering.

A Rich Tradition: Barlé Gonpa

Murig Geshe Nyima Kunchap bestowing an empowerment of longevity at Barle Gompa 2018. Photo credit: Unknown.

A twenty minute walk from the village of Barlé in Dolpo, Nepal is the Barlé gonpa called Yungdrung Shuk Tsal Ling. The main part of the temple located next to the lama residence is said to be over 500 years old. The surrounding area is very green in Summer and the village residents rely heavily upon agriculture. Although the village is a mix of both Bön and Buddhist families, they visit each other’s temples and sacred sites.

Left: Barle Rinpoche Right: Barle Rinpoche with Geshe Kunchap Rinpoche

The Barlé gonpa was renovated by the father of Barlé Lama Tsukphü Gyaltsen, who assisted in the work. Although most of the Barlé lamas have been ngakpas, or householder lamas, Barlé Lama Tsukphü Gyaltsen did not want to follow this lifestyle and instead received monk’s vows at the age of eighteen. He traveled to Samling and stayed there for three years. He received teachings and initiations from Yongdzin Tenzin Namdak Rinpoche as well as from Sangye Tenzin Rinpoche. Eventually, he returned to the village of Barlé and immediately began to look for a proper place for secluded meditation.

The cave hermitage of Barle Rinpoche. Photo credit: Geshe Nyima Kunchap

A thirty minutes walk from the gonpa, up a steep cliff, he found the spot that he was looking for. The nearby rock formation naturally resembled a chorten and there was a stone painting of the enlightened Lord Tönpa Shenrap nearby. Here, he began to construct Drak Gön hermitage, literally “Stone Temple Hermitage.” The first part was completed in 1962. For thirty years, from 1970-2000, he remained in retreat at the hermitage. On the 27th lunar day of the 4th month in the Western year 2000, his outward breath stopped. His body remained in the five-fold meditation posture for three full days.

Recently erected chorten overlooking Barle village. Photo credit: Geshe Nyima Kunchap.

After the passing of Barlé Rinpoche, his nephew Lama Lhakpa assumed the duties of the main lama of Barlé. He was a householder and lived in the lama residence. He unexpectedly passed away in 2015 and his son took up the duties of being the village lama.

Murig Geshe Nyima Kunchap Rinpoche with the residents of Barle at the newly erected chorten. Photo credit: Unknown

Both a relative and student of Barlé Lama Tsukphü Gyaltsen Rinpoche, Murig Geshe Nyima Kunchap Rinpoche was born in the village of Barlé. At the age of eight, he began learning the Tibetan language and thangkha painting. At the age of fourteen, he learned to make torma and practiced the ngondro, or foundational practices. Strongly wanting to become a monk, he left the village of Barlé and made his way to India where he received renunciate vows from HH 33rd Menri Trizen Rinpoche and HE Yongdzin Tenzin Namdak Rinpoche. Completing his studies in the dialectic program, he received his doctorate of Geshe in 1994. Subsequently, he worked as the Bön department chairmen at the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies in Varanasi. He founded and acted as president of the Dolpo Bon Society and founded the Dolpo Bon School for girls and boys. Although he travels worldwide teaching and performing rituals of the Yungdrung Bön tradition, he regularly returns to the village of Barlé. Most recently, he personally sponsored the construction of a sacred chorten in the village. (See previous post: https://ravencypresswood.com/2018/07/21/a-chorten-for-barle-village/) In these ways, he continues to preserve and expand the rich Yungdrung Bön traditions of his lineage for the benefit of the Barlé residents, and beyond.

Geshe Kunchap Rinpoche leading the consecration ritual for the newly erected chorten in Barle village. Photo credit: Unknown

The tulku of Barlé Rinpoche was recognized at an early age in the village of Barlé. He naturally showed the signs of being familiar with the life of his previous incarnation, Barlé Lama Tsukphü Gyaltsen Rinpoche.

Barle Tulku, Tsewang Rigdzin Gyaltsen. Photo credit: Unknown

Although a difficult decision for his mother, she agreed to have him go to Menri Monastery in Dolanji, India in order to receive the proper training.Geshe Nyima Kunchap has taken personal responsibility to ensure his well being and education.

Geshe Nyima Kunchap Rinpoche and Tulku Tsewang Rigdzin Gyaltsen. Photo credit: Unknown.

 

The Sharp Point of Wisdom

Monks debating at Nangzhig Monastery. Photo credit: Unknown

Homage to the Spiritual Father!

HE Menri Ponlop Rinpoche offers the mandala to HH 34th Menri Trizin during his enthronement ceremony at Menri Monastery in Dolanji, India. Photo credit: Unknown

May the Light of Joy Shine for Everyone!

young monks at Menri Monastery in Dolanji, India. Photo credit: Unknown

 

Selection of the New 34th Menri Trizin

Offerings to the Religious Protectors of Yungdrung Bon. Photo Credit: Menri Monastery

After lengthy consultation with His Eminence Yongdzin Tenzin Namdak Rinpoche, the selection process for the 34th Menri Trizin began on the 1st day of the 11th lunar month, December 19th 2017, at Menri Monastery under the direction of His Eminence Menri Lopon Yangton Thrinley Nyima Rinpoche. In general, every Yungdrung Bön geshe is an eligible candidate. However, due to the current difficult situation, it has been decided that only those candidates outside of Tibet are eligible. If for any reason, an eligible geshe does not want to be considered as a candidate, he is free to withdraw his name by contacting the monastery. After these considerations, there were approximately sixty names of eligible candidates.

Names of candidates. Photo credit: Menri Monastery

On December 19th, Menri Lopön Thrinley Nyima Rinpoche, Triten Norbutse Khenpo Tenpa Yungdrung Rinpoche, as well as other exalted professors and administrative members wrote each candidate’s name onto a small piece of paper, and placed that paper inside of a ball of tsampa dough, which was then dried in the sun. Each of these balls of tsampa dough were placed into two separate vases, and sealed with wax. These vases were placed in the protector temple and will remain there while lengthy prayers and offerings are made to the religious protectors in order to invoke their wisdom.

Prayers and rituals being performed. Photo credit: Menri Monastery

On December 21st, many prayers and offerings were made in order to remove all obstacles and hindrances. On December 22nd, the main rituals began which will take six days to complete. The majority of the monastic community will be performing the One Hundred Thousand Offerings to Sipé Gyalmo in the main temple. Simultaneously, there will also be offerings and prayers to the main yidam of the Menri Trizin, Purba, at the Menri Trizin lama residence by a smaller group of monks.

Yungdrung Bon monks praying in the main temple of Menri Monastery. Photo credit: Menri Monastery.

On the morning of December 27th, His Eminence Menri Lopön Thrinley Nyima Rinpoche will shake the first vase until a ball of tsampa dough comes forth. Then, he will similarly shake the second vase until a ball of tsampa dough comes forth. These two balls of dough, each containing a candidate’s name inside, will then be placed into a vase. Another five days of offerings and prayers to the religious protectors will commence.

Notice and schedule of ritual events posted at Menri Monastery. Photo credit: Khedup Gyatso.

On the morning of January 1st, the vase containing the two names will be shaken in front of the sacred image of Lord Tönpa Shenrap Miwoche in the main temple by His Eminence Menri Lopön Thrinley Nyima Rinpoche. The tsampa dough that emerges will contain the name of the 34th Menri Trizin. This traditional process is known as Lha Sung Den Tarwa, Requesting the Religious Protectors to Reveal the Truth.

During this time, it has been requested that the worldwide Yungdrung Bön family offer prayers and aspirations for the selection of the 34th Menri Trizin.

Offering Light

Offering light at Menri Monastery in Dolanji, India. Photo credit: Unknown.

Offering Devotion and Receiving Blessings

His Eminence Yangton Menri Lopon Rinpoche presents the butter lamp offering.

On November 4, 2017, on the 15th day of the 9th Tibetan month, Tashi Menri Monastery in Dolanji, India held memorial events to mark the 49th day after the passing into liberation of the 33rd Menri Trizin Lungtok Tenpé Nyima Rinpoche. By invitation of His Eminence Menri Lopon Trinley Nyima Rinpoche, the tulkus, professors, geshes, and monks assembled in the temple. There, before the precious cremation bones, ash and relics of the 33rd Menri Trizin Rinpoche, with a feeling of intense longing, they prostrated and recited the Prayer to the Victor Bön, His Holiness Lungtok Tenpé Nyima Rinpoche.

L-Holy cremation ash C-Holy ringsel R-Holy cremation bone

Following that, the Praise of the Twelve Deeds of Shenrap Miwo Künlé Nampar Gyalwa was recited. Having formally presented the precious cremation bones, ash and relics to His Eminence Menri Lopon Rinpoche, he gifted each member of the monastic community with the actual accomplishment of the support for blessings, a majestic and empowered cremation bone.

Nuns of Menri perform the Tsewang Bo Yulma Tsok.

In the afternoon, the Menri community of nuns gathered and performed the Feast Offering of the Tséwang Bö Yulma. During this time, other monastic colleges within Menri Monastery performed various practices and rituals as well. Later, everyone gathered outside in the courtyard and again recited the Praise of the Twelve Deeds and the Prayer to His Holiness Lungtok Tenpé Nyima Rinpoche.

L-Cremation tsa tsa containing holy cremation bone. R-Public receiving a tsa tsa.

From then until midnight, both the monastic community and the public offered butter lamps, prostrations, and circumambulated the lama residence where the 33rd Menri Trizin had lived. At midnight, the public were invited to come before HE Menri Lopon Rinpoche and to receive a holy tsa tsa containing a majestic cremation bone inside. All of these holy relics, which are imbued with extraordinary power, are objects of support for the faithful to receive unlimited blessings and to develop profound devotion.

The Yungdrung Bon community chanting in the courtyard.

Once everyone had received a holy tsa tsa, they gathered outside where HE Menri Lopon Rinpoche led the presentation of the five offerings, the recitation of Offerings to the Lama, and the Prayer to His Holiness Lungtok Tenpé Nyima Rinpoche.

May the Wheel of the Yungdrung Bön Turn Forever!

Monks at Menri Monastery during the commemoration time for His Holiness 33rd Menri Trizen Rinpoche. Photo credit: Unknown

 

Prostrations to the Root Lama!

Offerings outside the lama residence at Menri Monastery after the passing off His Holiness 33rd Menri Trizen Rinpoche.

Gaining Knowledge

Yungdrung Bon monks during exams at Menri Monastery in Dolanji, India. Photo credit: Unknown

May the Yungdrung Bön Flourish!

Nangzhik Yungdrung Bon Monastery in Tibet

 

Sacred Gathering

Monks during a festival at Triten Norbutse Monastery near Kathmandu, Nepal. Photo credit Andrzej Nieckula

Special Announcement from Menri Monastery in India

Bum-Tsok: 100,000 Torma Offerings to Sidpe Gyalmo This Week

May 5, 2017

Dearest Friends

Greetings!  It is my pleasure to write to you today to share some news with you. Today, May 5th is the first day of the Sidpe Gyalmo Bum Tsok at Menri Monastery. This is the first Bum Tsok offering of the year 2017, and it will last one week.  All monks, nuns and lay practitioners (ngakpas) will make a total of 100,000 offerings to Sidpe Gyalmo and all the protector deities of the Yungdrung Bon. We will accumulate 100,000 of each of the offerings of the five senses, namely flowers, butter lamps, water bowls, incense and torma cakes. We will also offer the Nam Gye, which includes zug, dra, dri, ro, reg cha, bon and ter.

The reason for making 100,000 offerings is that the retinue of Sidpe Gyalmo is composed of 100,000 beings, so we should make one offering for each one. The purpose of the Bum Tsok offering is to bring peace, health, prosperity, and happiness to all sentient beings.

There aren’t any specific sponsors for the Bum Tsok. Anyone who wishes to contribute can do so for their own benefit or for the benefit of all sentient beings. The Bum Tsok also cleanses one’s obstacles, both inner and outer.  Outer obstacles are related to the five elements, disasters, and problems caused by harmful spirits.  Inner obstacles are problems such as depression, anxiety, and fear, especially when there are no external causes. The real causes are our karmic traces and tendencies carried over from our previous lives. Offering Bum Tsok to Sidpe Gyalmo is very helpful to clear away such obstacles.

A common saying in Tibetan is “Gyamtso chu tik drel wa.” A literal translation could be “A drop of water connects with the ocean.”  The meaning is that regardless of the size of our donation, our offering connects with and merges with the great ocean of offerings of the collective, and helps to increase its great virtue.

To those of you who would like to make an offering for yourself, for your family, or for all beings, the best way is to do so through Khyungdzong Wodsel Ling.

All offerings received by May 09 will be forwarded to Menri Monastery for this event.  All money received after that date will be held until the next Bum-Tsok.  These special offerings are only done once or twice a year so please send your offerings ASAP.

Offerings can be made at the KWLing.org website here:  http://kwling.org/bon/bum-tsok-offering/

With my blessings,

Menri Lopon Trinley Nyima

 

 

Prayers for Peace and Harmony

Prayer Flags at Tashi Menri Monastery in Dolanji, India. Photo credit: Unknown

Sacred Ceremony

Ceremony at Kyungkar Yungdrung Tenggye Ling Monastery in Tibet. Photo credit: Unknown

Ancient Symbols

The chakshing, hand object of Lord Tonpa Shenrap Miwoche, and the Yungdrung Bon flag atop Menri Monastery in Dholanji, India. Photo credit: Unknown

Offering the Mandala of the Entire Universe

Mandala offering during a special ceremony at Nangzhig Monastery in Tibet. Photo credit: Unknown

Gangru Gön Dargyé Monastery: The Flourishing Monastery Upon a Hill

Gangru Gon Dargye in Tibet, founded in 1310. Photo credit: Unknown

 

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